Best rap songs of all time list

Music education scholarships 2019 / Nea grant portal

“This is a fundamental truth about any sort of practice: If you never push yourself beyond your comfort zone, you will never improve. The amateur pianist who took half a dozen years of lessons when he was a teenager but who for the past 30 years has been playing the same set of songs in exactly the same way over and over again may have accumulated 10,000 hours of ‘practice’ during that time, but he is no better at playing the piano than he was 30 years ago. Indeed, he’s probably gotten worse.”

Jhoni Jackson is an Atlanta-born writer based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She covers Latinx music and culture for Remezcla, runs a monthly queer party, and also organizes a recurring pop-up feminist bazaar. Until last year, she co-owned a mid-size venue; right now, she’s plotting a new venture. Follow her on Twitter for links to her stories or on Instagram for (mostly) pictures of her cats.

Will Kuhn suggests that the rhythms of “Clair de Lune” are so weird because Debussy was trying to notate rubato. That sounds plausible to me. It turns out that when you quantize the piece over beats, it sounds very syncopated and hip. Live and learn.

Music programs for underprivileged youth

Let’s try a different strategy. I said you should tune the B string a major third above G, but you could just as easily tune the B string a fifth plus an octave above the low E string. So let’s go ahead and multiply 1 Hz by 3/2, and then double it, which gives you a B at 3 Hz. Now the B string sounds terrific against the low E at 1 Hz and the high E at 4 Hz.

You don’t have to be a strict minimalist when it comes to gear. If you’re keeping something just because you like it, that’s no problem! At least you have a connection to it!

Top 40 songs usually reach the first appearance of a chorus at around 0:45 seconds in. In other words, they rush to the chorus. What does this mean, other than that a song’s memorability is more important than its meaning and message? I’m not sure, but it’s a valid way to write and sell your song, that’s for sure!

This is one I’m sure you’re familiar with, even if you might not have known its fancy name. It’s also sometimes called Verse-Repeating or Chorus form, because it essentially repeats the same section, but with new lyrics each time. If we’re thinking of things in terms of “A” sections and “B” sections and so forth, this would just be multiple As, one after the other.

+ Learn more on Soundfly: Get all the best practices and strategies for running a successful crowdfunding campaign, plus mentor support from former Kickstarter staff, in our course Crowdfunding for Musicians. Use code FLYPAPERSENTME for $100 off the next Mainstage session, starting September 6!

National endowment for the arts and humanities

In 20th and 21st century music there is a lot of imagination and experimentation, and strong interest in spirituality in general. But there isn’t much of this kind of intimate interweaving of specific sounds with concrete theological symbols. Composers like James MacMillan are exploring this sort of theology-based musical practice, as one writer describes his work, “giving the symbols and signs of Christianity their own flesh-and-blood physicality.” Others like Arvo Pärt use related methods in a broader sense. And surely there are other creative musicians working in this vein today.

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Endlessly acquiring gear is a habit that can turn into an obsession. Whether you’re stockpiling synths, pedals, guitars, or plugins, your collection can turn into a burden that weighs you down creatively. Ask yourself these ten questions to find out if there’s any gear you have that you could do without.

He’s a virtual reality pioneer, a software humanist, a former rock musician and student of classical music. No surprise that Koosha’s current experimental electronic music embraces paradoxes. It’s chaotic, but reveals deep compositional intent. It’s futuristic while feeling nostalgic. It’s kitsch as well as sincerely melancholic. Born in Tehran and now based in London, he courts a vaporwave aesthetic and is firmly in the sonic vanguard of ambient sound. He has a bunch of stuff up on Bandcamp and the latest Stamina is a good place to start.