Violin scholarships for non music majors

Best hip hop albums of all time xxl / Old school rap artists

When you’ve got something to offer (a big ol’ crowd filled with fans, friends and family, or a new release under your belt), local venues are sure to take notice. By keeping the needs, expectations, and limitations of the venues and promoters you reach out to, you’ll have the best chance of getting booked.

Want to increase your band’s chances of getting booked? Try putting yourself in the shoes of venues, show promoters, and festival curators. Music making is too often an introverted, navel-gazing pursuit on the part of the artist, and a great deal of us work incredibly hard to make music and share it with the world, only to struggle in finding any tangible booking success.

+ Learn the nuances of producing beats, arranging tracks, and creative sampling, drawing on the rich history and influence of hip-hop in Soundfly’s popular mentored online course, The Art of Hip-Hop Production. 

List of 90s hip hop artists

Seeing that contrast between where she started to where she is now is just so incredible from a fan’s perspective because they know they’ve helped her make that journey.

+ Learn a new musical skill in 10 minutes. Explore Soundfly’s wide array of free online courses and gain a musical edge during your lunch break. Or sign up for the Soundfly Weekly newsletter and learn something new every Tuesday!

The eleventh edition of our student work sharing series, this one’s a summer blockbuster jam. Get ready to add some new tracks to your favorite playlist!

Raven: Alicia is just a special student. She comes to songwriting with a bright and unique voice, crafting lyrics that are conversational yet biting. As a student, she is diligent and hard-working. She receives feedback with grace and uses it as a means to enhancing her writing. I can’t say enough good things about her!

The tritone is a mainstay interval of heavy, dissonant rock riffage. In a most classic example, Black Sabbath’s self-titled song “Black Sabbath” (off the self-titled record, Black Sabbath) hits us with this massively dissonant tritone as soon as the band enters at 0:36, first jumping an octave before descending a gnarly diminished fifth, aiming to invoke the unequivocal power of the devil. The first time features a fast trill on the guitar, with a cleaner example of the interval at 0:47.

Grants for music students

From her native Tunisia via France, Abdelwahed made her name playing sets in places like The Boiler Room and Berghain. Her work fuses gritty urban dance rhythms with unconventional textures; it’s ambient, industrial, and traditional Arab music all wrapped up within an experimental techno framework. In an interview she poses a question that summarizes her artistic vision: “If the people who invented house and techno were Arab, if they had grown up with our rhythms and our instruments, what would it sound like? Would it be the drum and bass, house and techno we know today? I don’t think so.” Abdelwahed’s latest album is Khonna, released in November 2018.

All of the notes above Fret 12 on any string are just repetitions of the same notes, an octave above (for example, Fret 14 on the 6th string is an F#, an octave above the same note on Fret 2 on the same string). Therefore, we can simply subtract 12 from the fret number and proceed repeating the same process we have discussed until now.

“Look Alive”: Aaand we’ve got more Drake. Aaand we’ve also got another somewhat subjective tonality. What we’ve got is three intervals, A and E (an A5 chord), A and D (D5/A), and B♭ and D (B♭ no fifth), and a bass line that adds an F in there (for a♭VI chord, arguably). There’s also no singing to help us establish tonality, and so I first heard it in D minor, but after repeated listening, I realized it was just my brain filling in gaps to meet my tonal bias. It would actually be truer to classify this as A Phrygian because with the A  F  D  B♭ bass line, and without any concrete triads, it’s best to leave it up to the musical scale that matches the sound, and the Phrygian scale here clicks better than anything else.

“Artists of the early 1700s did not wear their lives on their sleeves… Their goal was not to expose the hidden and the personal but to replicate the empirical and the universal; their domain was not the unconscious but the observable world.”

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Share your goals with us and we’ll find a course for you, or create a custom mentorship session with a pro musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran, to help you achieve them.